Post 1: VAMPIRES, GHOSTS, AND FAERIES, OH MY

The first blog lays some of the groundwork for how I’ll be considering Irish lit and horror in this series, and discusses 3 pieces of literature and 3 films in relation to that framework. I take CarmillaDracula, and “The Canterville Ghost” as texts from Irish literature, and The Moth DiariesByzantium, and The Hallow as filmic texts to explore some of the foundational monsters in Irish horror, and more importantly, what they mean.

Post 2: OF SHARKS AND SERIAL KILLERS

The second installment of the Irish Horror Blog discusses how reading Jeremy Lovering’s 2013 film In Fear through the rhetorical logic of Caitlín R. Kiernan’s 2012 novel The Drowning Girl helps to illuminate the political contexts of both texts. I look at each as decolonial texts, and consider how In Fear‘s particular approach to decolonialism falls short of intersection critique in its handling of gender, violence, and agency.

Post 3: CREEPY CHILDREN AND THE NEW GOTHIC

This post looks at the ways in which the gothic genre is updated in contemporary fiction and film. It looks critically at three texts which focus in various ways on children, centering them within larger sociocultural anxieties and hierarchies. The post addresses Jonathan Auxier’s The Night Gardener, John Boyne’s This House Is Haunted, and Ciaran Foy’s Citadel.

Posts 4-7: COMPLEX PERSONHOOD AND FORMAL EXPERIMENTATION: WHERE IRELAND, DECOLONIALISM, AND WEIRD FICTION MEET

These next few posts will be a series, published weekly, based on a much longer paper discussing The Drowning Girl and Portrait of a Zombie in relation to neocolonialism, haunting, and exorcising heteropatriarchal colonization.

Image Credit: Geneveive Newman © 2015

 

 

Author: Geneveive Newman